Vehicle Kit

sarco2000

Beyond the Grid
#1
I have a couple bags that I keep in the Jeep and I have most of what Jay has (not all). Mostly it's Get Home Stuff.

I also keep a burner phone with a new minutes card in one of the bags for emergencies where I lose my cell phone or whatever. Burner phones are cheap, and the cheap ones also seem to have the best battery life when turned off and stored!

Also, a small saw and small shovel.

One thing I don't think has been mentioned about water - I keep water in the jeep but what if it freezes? You can't drink ice. So I keep an aluminum GI canteen 3/4 full, and a small butane camping stove. The stove can be used to either melt the ice in the canteen, or heat the inside of the vehicle if I'm stuck in the winter. Or heat the MREs in the canteen cup, or boil water for drinking.

For the wife's car, I need to work on that. Currently the only thing we keep in there is an IFAK.

.
 

sarco2000

Beyond the Grid
#3
That's not a bad idea. How cold does it get there?

Here I've been outside at more than 30F below zero. That doesn't happen often, but below zero is not uncommon at all.

.
 

HandLoad

Magnificat
Brass Subscriber
#5
While I have been here, it has never gone below -10°F...that covers 24+ Years. A reasonably sealed up car interior in the Sunlight, warms some above ambient - then there is the nighttime, loong in deep of Winter...

Suppose when You lot go -20 or more, it could be difficult to keep water liquid. Might have to add a bit of um, anti-freeze...
 

Jayclimber

Modern Minuteman
Moderator
Brass Subscriber
#6
I'm always amazed at the lack of preparedness in people's vehicles, especially in the winter months!

In my vehicle I keep year round:

-first aid kit
-fleece blanket
-water (six 1-liter bottles from the dollar store)
-jumper cables
-flares
-flashlight
-gloves

In the winter time I add:
-collapsible avalanche shove
-sleeping bags
-wool hats
-winter gloves
-chemical hand warmers
-bag of ice melt

The above combined with a GHB and you are pretty much set out of your vehicle.

I do love the stove idea @sarco2000 ... I have a small, collapsible butane powered stove that would work perfect for this. I'm gonna find a surplus canteen cup and use that idea!
 

Mattsn

Well-known member
Brass Subscriber
#8
So. Up until a few months ago i worked 1 mile from my House. I never had a "get home bag" i never needed one. Now i have a 17 mile commute. Plus over a 4.5 mile long bridge.

So i need a new bag and begin putting one of these kits together.

Concerning this bridge, anyone have any ideas of something specific i would need if i had to walk across
 

Donfini2

Slayer of hops and barley
Brass Subscriber
#9
The bridge or the water?
I wonder if, hold your laughter, a folding scooter would be good for getting across and off the bridge. You could toss it and press on from there once across.
 

sarco2000

Beyond the Grid
#10
I can't think of anything specific to a bridge, but that 4.5 miles of water would have me concerned!

Maybe an inflatable small boat and collapsible oars? That's getting pretty hard core though! But it wouldn't take up THAT much room, would easily fit in a trunk.

.
 

Donfini2

Slayer of hops and barley
Brass Subscriber
#11
That’s a long distance in snarled traffic, I would really consider brass knuckles. There will be people mad
 

Donfini2

Slayer of hops and barley
Brass Subscriber
#13
I can't think of anything specific to a bridge, but that 4.5 miles of water would have me concerned!

Maybe an inflatable small boat and collapsible oars? That's getting pretty hard core though! But it wouldn't take up THAT much room, would easily fit in a trunk.

.
It’s a line of thought I’ve never considered,
1) you have from the beginning of the bridge (how far do you say is the turn around walk back and launch boat)
2) The middle of the bridge, not a boat option.
3) the last quarter of the bridge to deal with upset folks.

So you need both land and sea options.
 

sarco2000

Beyond the Grid
#14
Hmm, wrecks blocking the bridge would require a way to move them.

Best way would be to hook up a rope or strap and tow them out of the way. But you can't always do that - the wrecks may be wedged in, or facing the wrong direction, or you can't tow in the correct direction because of other wrecks.

A small come-along can move a car if it's on rolling wheels, a bigger come-along may be able to move cars that are stuck, especially if you combine it with some rope and a few blocks to compound the torque. If you have blocks and enough rope, you can move just about anything.

I actually keep a come-along (a poor man's winch), tow strap, and a length of chain in my jeep in the winter.

.
 

Mattsn

Well-known member
Brass Subscriber
#15
I think a small raft and oars woukd be insufficient for a 4.5 mile treck across the bay.. Moving cars would not be too much an issue with my truck. As for mentioned extra mags, i live in maryland. No gun carry

I just thought id throw out the question to see if anyone could think of something i havent. Im assuming the bridge would still be intact and i could continue to wallk across it if i had to.

I'm looking on amazon for a new bag to hold my gear ill keep in my truck. I already keep some provision in the truck. But theyre in the glove box, console, under seat now.
 

sauced07

Well-known member
Brass Subscriber
#16
I think a small raft and oars woukd be insufficient for a 4.5 mile treck across the bay.. Moving cars would not be too much an issue with my truck. As for mentioned extra mags, i live in maryland. No gun carry

I just thought id throw out the question to see if anyone could think of something i havent. Im assuming the bridge would still be intact and i could continue to wallk across it if i had to.

I'm looking on amazon for a new bag to hold my gear ill keep in my truck. I already keep some provision in the truck. But theyre in the glove box, console, under seat now.
I would approach your situation in layers. Very important things in a small pouch or two for your pockets. Next level of items to a fanny pack like was brought up on another thread. Then finally your pack. That way you’ll always have essential items even if you have to ditch something
 

240Geezer

Well-known member
Gold Subscriber
#17
So. Up until a few months ago i worked 1 mile from my House. I never had a "get home bag" i never needed one. Now i have a 17 mile commute. Plus over a 4.5 mile long bridge.

So i need a new bag and begin putting one of these kits together.

Concerning this bridge, anyone have any ideas of something specific i would need if i had to walk across
How about a different route.
The shortest isn’t necessarily the best. Or fastest sometimes.
 

harbinger

don't panic and carry a towel
Brass Subscriber
#19
Matt I've had one of these packs for a GHB/BOB for 4+ years if I had to guess. I've took it out on a few hikes and wit 15-20 pounds in it it rides good. It's held up great being in my truck the majority of the time I've owned it.
Lifetime Warranty and cost friendly. 29L I believe.
Think I paid a little bit more but less than $30 at WM.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Outdoor-Products-Quest-Daypack/51036937

 

Mattsn

Well-known member
Brass Subscriber
#20
How about a different route.
The shortest isn’t necessarily the best. Or fastest sometimes.
Different route home means i have to go up to the top of the bay, go around, and come back down. That's almost a 3hr drive without traffic if i go around Baltimore.otherwise ill have to go through Baltimore, shaving maybe 30 mins off that 3hrs. But going through Baltimore creates a whole new set of problems in a SHTF event. .