Help Me Buy A Portable Band Saw Mill

The Branch Manager

Winter is coming. Forever.
Gold Subscriber
#21
Two other thoughts. Wranglestar has some fancy circle mill, I'll get the name. It might be your best bet for lumber. I believe it to be the 8-30. These are "less" portable but still pickup portable.

You might also not want a portable mill, I didn't. The only reason I'm building the new mill on a trailer is for the eventual evac to high ground before the reversal. Diesel because I have almost everything collected for diesel production from crop waste. Also looking at/for an oil expeller.

I've collected a near complete set of antique beatty marked chisels and axes, boring machine, etc. Timber framing a house is my final goal, but I'm starting with the bunker.

https://www.lucasmill.com/Portable-Timber-Sawmills/Circular-Swing-Blade-Mills
 

GOBLIN X

INVOLUNTARY full time LAB-RAT for MUSC
Brass Subscriber
#22
Yep. There's like a 52 Olds or similar in field around the corner from our place.
Got a big ass saw blade sticking out the trunk area.
Figure they powered it off one side of the rear diff.
Been there 30 years or more.
BET they would sell it for the right price.................. have all the shafting and a non electronic donar. 52 probably overhead valve manual lifter rocket III motor............. if a sedan suicide back doors..........................where this car be?:devilish::devilish::devilish::devilish::devilish::devilish::devilish:
 

Bacash

Just a guy
Brass Subscriber
#23
my uncles had a similar set up for plank and beam cept they would build a deck set the spinner, mount the blade and hook the belt to a hub adapter on a surplus deuce and a half. I would set there as a youngun and watch the old black man that would "set" and sharpen the teeth, every dozen or so logs, and stand there while it was spinnin with a coke bottle and a handful of pine straw and drarg draw K2 on the blade where they were cuttin pine. they had 4 blades, 2 for pine, 1 for oak and hard wood and one the worst out of the lot, for fence line trees....................... I can still smell the diesel and sawdust. my first introduction to MO-gas.

a lil ingenuity you could build a sawmill out a junkyard car.

Maybe this is a dumb question and I’m missing the obvious, but how did they split the wood when it was in longer lengths?
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Those look to to split not sawed and 4’ or so at least.
 

The Branch Manager

Winter is coming. Forever.
Gold Subscriber
#24
Wedges and ass. Probably a 20lb maul to drive them. It's not horrible, I have a nice piece of red oak about 30" and 22' long I couldn't load nor drag, so we wedged it in half. Took about an hour with 3 guys pounding, but it split right along the center seam where we intended. I may have pics, if not the pieces are still in the "to cut" pile and I'll take some Saturday. Pretty sure we've got pics of the process but I don't think they're in this phone.
 

The Branch Manager

Winter is coming. Forever.
Gold Subscriber
#26
I've tried using two log splitters, but it didn't break along a straight line, rather the twist of the grain. With wedges, you're able to correct a run, kinda. Some trees just aren't worth splitting, and with practice you'll be able to tell by the bark. It's one of those things you have to experience, there is no way to teach it since every tree is different inside.

Another tool that's invaluable is a debarker for your chainsaw. Cuts the bark and takes the dirt with it, saving your saw band from contacting the grit.

Unless you know your timber is clean of metals, you'll also want a metal detector. Most city and yard trees I've cut have had nails. Stuff on acreage is normally good and clean.

A bark spud is a good investment also.
 

GOBLIN X

INVOLUNTARY full time LAB-RAT for MUSC
Brass Subscriber
#27
I've tried using two log splitters, but it didn't break along a straight line, rather the twist of the grain. With wedges, you're able to correct a run, kinda. Some trees just aren't worth splitting, and with practice you'll be able to tell by the bark. It's one of those things you have to experience, there is no way to teach it since every tree is different inside.

Another tool that's invaluable is a debarker for your chainsaw. Cuts the bark and takes the dirt with it, saving your saw band from contacting the grit.

Unless you know your timber is clean of metals, you'll also want a metal detector. Most city and yard trees I've cut have had nails. Stuff on acreage is normally good and clean.

A bark spud is a good investment also.
thats why they saved the bad blade for fenceline trees. ones they know had barbed wire grown in em. tell by the bumps on the trunk.