Friction fires...

Jayclimber

Modern Minuteman
Moderator
Brass Subscriber
#1
Anyone practice or have a prefered friction fire method? Let's see your successes, attempts, and failures...
 

Jayclimber

Modern Minuteman
Moderator
Brass Subscriber
#2
I was practicing bow/drill last night and got and ember and started a small fire. In the excitement I got nothing documented. So I tried this morning and cant get an ember to save my life. Lol...

Fluff from the inside of bark...
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Tinder nest ready to go with fluff and shavings...
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Lots of attempts...
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I'll try again later...
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Mattsn

Well-known member
Brass Subscriber
#6
To answer your question Jay, I haven't spent alot of time making friction fires. I've tried a handful of times. Been successful a few times but probably un successful most of them.

I'm currently burning leaves and fallen sticks that's I started with a ferro rod.
 

Optimist

Well-known member
#7
I have pretty good luck with the fire drill when I have good char cloth and very fine tinder. Usually, though, I use a burning lens on the char cloth, or spark it. I have ferro, or flint and steel.
 

GOBLIN X

INVOLUNTARY full time LAB-RAT for MUSC
Brass Subscriber
#10
got a old Tuberose snuff can i do the same with Optiminst. mines round, bout the size of a half dollar, bout 3.5 inches tall with tha lid on it. screw down lid. had this one for years.
 

LostViking

Well-known member
Brass Subscriber
#12
Jay,

I have played with the friction fire route. My success rate is probably less than 30%.
It’s a lot harder than it looks, and it looks hard.

No photos, because I’m almost always half dead when I get done.

I think a lot has to do with where you live. No forest fire risk, harder to make a friction fire.

High forest fire risk, easier to do.

I have had good success making char cloth in an altoids tin.
 

Jayclimber

Modern Minuteman
Moderator
Brass Subscriber
#14
Jay,

I have played with the friction fire route. My success rate is probably less than 30%.
It’s a lot harder than it looks, and it looks hard.

No photos, because I’m almost always half dead when I get done.

I think a lot has to do with where you live. No forest fire risk, harder to make a friction fire.

High forest fire risk, easier to do.

I have had good success making char cloth in an altoids tin.
I'm realizing this that it's harder in less fire risk areas. Conditions have to be pretty good for higher success rate.

We've made char cloth in tins and it's standard in our fire kits. But for quick and easy fires I prefer a ferro rod and oiled cotton balls. Fast, easy, and reliable!
 

Mattsn

Well-known member
Brass Subscriber
#15
I'm realizing this that it's harder in less fire risk areas. Conditions have to be pretty good for higher success rate.

We've made char cloth in tins and it's standard in our fire kits. But for quick and easy fires I prefer a ferro rod and oiled cotton balls. Fast, easy, and reliable!
I always keep cotton balls around. I knead vasaline into them. It works awesome.