Check out these tiny homes!

The Branch Manager

Winter is coming. Forever.
Gold Subscriber
#2
I hope this doesn't offend anyone, but from a survivalist homestead type person, these are possibly the biggest waste of money I can think of besides donating to the DNC. For extra barracks, MiL suites, etc. they might be ok, but IMO thru are not an option for 'our' lifestyle. They would also make good temporary housing while you get your real house up, but again that's silly expensive.

I have 2 friends that got sold on them after the flood. One was just under 40k, the other has "I made a horrible mistake" amount of money in hers. I'm guessing close to 50. Both had newer single wides before the flood. That were bigger and right at 45 installed new.

Compare that to one of my employees who went and got a 16x20 home depot type shed and fixed it up just as nice and the kid has about 18k in it. Furnished. That also includes his little, still unfinished, solar system. I think he's just down to batteries left.
 

Grevlin

"Fly birdies!...fly!"
Administrator
#3
I hope this doesn't offend anyone, but from a survivalist homestead type person, these are possibly the biggest waste of money I can think of besides donating to the DNC. For extra barracks, MiL suites, etc. they might be ok, but IMO thru are not an option for 'our' lifestyle. They would also make good temporary housing while you get your real house up, but again that's silly expensive.

I have 2 friends that got sold on them after the flood. One was just under 40k, the other has "I made a horrible mistake" amount of money in hers. I'm guessing close to 50. Both had newer single wides before the flood. That were bigger and right at 45 installed new.

Compare that to one of my employees who went and got a 16x20 home depot type shed and fixed it up just as nice and the kid has about 18k in it. Furnished. That also includes his little, still unfinished, solar system. I think he's just down to batteries left.
Most of these "modern" tiny homes have the same or more per/sq ft cost as normal residential sized new construction. They are just smaller, which makes them cost less.

I believe the better way is to piece together design, building techniques, and materials to maximize size, cost, and heat/cooling requirements. Similar to the option you mentioned about the pre-fab shed.
 

240Geezer

Old dude with a ‘tude
Gold Subscriber
#6
I guess it’s the easy mobility factor coupled with the more homey feel than say a camper.
For a permanent place, like a hunting camp or even a bol, Then I’m thinking stick built.
Could be prefab or selfbuilt.
Nothing too fancy on piers or even blocks
should come in at 50/sq/ft. Cheaper if youre a scrounger.
I think I spent $300 ish on the 8x12 shed I built 20 odd years ago. It’s still as strong as when I built it.
 

240Geezer

Old dude with a ‘tude
Gold Subscriber
#14
Start adding in the “I wants” and the price will skyrocket. Especially if you’re unable to do the work yourself.
I usually say stick built when discussing this type of construction. Just for the simple fact that almost anyone can drive a nail and saw a two by. Also moving stick lumber can be done one piece at a time if need be. Again by almost anyone.
Block, Stone, steel are usually heavier than most can handle if it has to be moved by hand.
Pros and equipment add up fast.
 

sonofliberty

Well-known member
#15
Steel roofs are cheaper than shingle. But, if the frame is built, I can do the rest.

ETA: I just reread how I wrote that. I am not a roofer. Never done any roofing. I would definitely want the roof and frame done professionally.
 
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Bacash

Just a guy
Brass Subscriber
#16
Steel roofs are cheaper than shingle. But, if the frame is built, I can do the rest.
No offense intended here, but if you’ve never laid a steel roof, or helped lay one, I wouldn’t bet on being able to just walk out and do it. As someone who has laid a lot of roof down, of both types, it is quite a bit trickier to lay a steel roof properly. If it’s just a simple gable roof and you don’t want any of the trim, which is what really helps seal out living things and the elements, it wouldnt be too hard. However, if you intend to do it right with all of the trim pieces, it ain’t that simple. Shingles are far simpler, as long as you cover all your nails and make sure you lay uphill, the things pretty much seal themselves.
 

sonofliberty

Well-known member
#17
No offense intended here, but if you’ve never laid a steel roof, or helped lay one, I wouldn’t bet on being able to just walk out and do it. As someone who has laid a lot of roof down, of both types, it is quite a bit trickier to lay a steel roof properly. If it’s just a simple gable roof and you don’t want any of the trim, which is what really helps seal out living things and the elements, it wouldnt be too hard. However, if you intend to do it right with all of the trim pieces, it ain’t that simple. Shingles are far simpler, as long as you cover all your nails and make sure you lay uphill, the things pretty much seal themselves.
I can't do it. I know I can't. I need someone to do the framing and roofing. I can do the rest, but I would prefer to have help.
 

Jayclimber

Modern Minuteman
Moderator
Brass Subscriber
#19
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https://www.lowes.com/pd/Best-Barns...est_Barns&CAWELAID=&kpid=50429728&CAGPSPN=pla{ifdyn:dyn}&k_clickID=4efc8162-2a21-47ab-a911-4519e5c8f3bb&msclkid=a6578257680715a1331bd979d3e72094


clear-best-barns-wood-sheds-arlington-1224-64_1000.jpg
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Best-Ba...PIPHorizontal2_rr-_-203242403-_-203431899-_-N

Two quick searches for 12' x 24' sheds with loft came up with these two... Both under $10k but you need to buy/build floor and foundation and shingles. I could do that.

Materials delivered curbside if you aren't concerned about OPSEC.