A preview of one possible outcome in the US under socialist rule?

Inazone

Self-Determination or Death
Brass Subscriber
#1
As truly unfortunate as events in Venezuela over the past few years have been, I find the whole situation both interesting and educational. However, I hadn't previously read anything detailing urban vs. rural life under the current political conditions, and it wouldn't be a stretch to imagine a similar scenario if something along those same lines were to play out in the US under socialist leadership, given the inordinate importance placed on urban living and disdain (in some quarters) for rural Americans.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/worl...-presidents-orders/ar-BBYUvg7?ocid=spartanntp
 

AGreyMan

I'm gravely disappointed.
Brass Subscriber
#3
Couple points hit home for me.

1) The intervention of a mechanism for law and order is apparently a big desire. Marxist guérillas, self -defense forces, etc. Part of me wonders if that translates to the same extent to the US. Are Venezuelans just habituated to having the government do things (like law and order) for them? Would Americans pay the Sheriff and deputies in food? Form a Militia? A posse? Elect a judge?

2) Medical care is non existant. The article states that the town doctor left to find medicines and never came back.

3) Communications are down. In the article, some family tried to get the wholesaler to come pick up their produce, but he cell tower was down.

4) No electricity due to lack of fuel for the generation plant.

Again, part of me wants to think that a group of Americans in that situation would sort themselves out pretty quick, organizing law enforcement, maybe putting a waterwheel in the river for power, finding some citizen who knows some herbal medicine, etc. but I am not sure if that’s realistic. If this were the 1950s, I’d have no doubts.
 

sauced07

Well-known member
Brass Subscriber
#4
Couple points hit home for me.

1) The intervention of a mechanism for law and order is apparently a big desire. Marxist guérillas, self -defense forces, etc. Part of me wonders if that translates to the same extent to the US. Are Venezuelans just habituated to having the government do things (like law and order) for them? Would Americans pay the Sheriff and deputies in food? Form a Militia? A posse? Elect a judge?

2) Medical care is non existant. The article states that the town doctor left to find medicines and never came back.

3) Communications are down. In the article, some family tried to get the wholesaler to come pick up their produce, but he cell tower was down.

4) No electricity due to lack of fuel for the generation plant.

Again, part of me wants to think that a group of Americans in that situation would sort themselves out pretty quick, organizing law enforcement, maybe putting a waterwheel in the river for power, finding some citizen who knows some herbal medicine, etc. but I am not sure if that’s realistic. If this were the 1950s, I’d have no doubts.
That’s how we’ve done it all along. Folks sorted shit out amongst themselves. It helped in the beginning when most had some type of religious background.
 

The Branch Manager

Winter is coming. Forever.
Gold Subscriber
#6
Couple points hit home for me.

1) The intervention of a mechanism for law and order is apparently a big desire. Marxist guérillas, self -defense forces, etc. Part of me wonders if that translates to the same extent to the US. Are Venezuelans just habituated to having the government do things (like law and order) for them? Would Americans pay the Sheriff and deputies in food? Form a Militia? A posse? Elect a judge?

2) Medical care is non existant. The article states that the town doctor left to find medicines and never came back.

3) Communications are down. In the article, some family tried to get the wholesaler to come pick up their produce, but he cell tower was down.

4) No electricity due to lack of fuel for the generation plant.

Again, part of me wants to think that a group of Americans in that situation would sort themselves out pretty quick, organizing law enforcement, maybe putting a waterwheel in the river for power, finding some citizen who knows some herbal medicine, etc. but I am not sure if that’s realistic. If this were the 1950s, I’d have no doubts.
I took this picture the other day, but I wasted it jacking with Goblin about the pink walls. The significance of this picture was actually to show y'all that I have almost got a complete set of 1951 audels books , and I have several that were out of print after I think the 42 Edition. Specifically that oil burner book. I would advise anybody with any level of mechanical inkling knowledge to locate an entire set of these. Takes a little patience but they are pretty cheap on eBay.

20200117_185304.jpg
 

Optimist

NMR. 11/04/2020
Brass Subscriber
#7
Yep. The important laws are scientific... You really need to add a copy of the CRC Handbook (Chemistry) and the Machinery's Handbook to that shelf....

Problem with scientific laws, they'll get you even if there ain't a cop around....
 
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240Geezer

Old dude with a ‘tude
Gold Subscriber
#8
I took this picture the other day, but I wasted it jacking with Goblin about the pink walls. The significance of this picture was actually to show y'all that I have almost got a complete set of 1951 audels books , and I have several that were out of print after I think the 42 Edition. Specifically that oil burner book. I would advise anybody with any level of mechanical inkling knowledge to locate an entire set of these. Takes a little patience but they are pretty cheap on eBay.

View attachment 13858
My father had those. Swore by them.
Of course that was a guy that honestly had a hard time operating a screwdriver. 🤣
I honestly don’t know where I got my mechanical ability. Coulda been the mailman but at least I got it.
 

The Branch Manager

Winter is coming. Forever.
Gold Subscriber
#9
They're just really plain English text. For example it goes through the process of realigning Babbitt bearings from scratch in simple enough language that anyone with the idea of what a Babbitt bearing is can understand.
 

GOBLIN X

INVOLUNTARY full time LAB-RAT for MUSC
Brass Subscriber
#10
still got a set of scrapers for doing the side clearance on a in the white babbit bearing.
got a full set, as well as the full set of popular mechanics project books, 12 books, hardbound dated 1952 paid 5$ for the set at a yard sale.
have that old book smell........
 

Optimist

NMR. 11/04/2020
Brass Subscriber
#11
Lot of good tools to be had at garage sales.... Speakin' of Babbit bearings, used to cast 'em when it was time to overhaul the big lathe in the oil patch shop I came up in. That would have been a big one to scrape, being that the through hole in the headstock was about fifteen inches.
 

The Branch Manager

Winter is coming. Forever.
Gold Subscriber
#12
Yep. The important laws are scientific... You really need to add a copy of the CRC Handbook (Chemistry) and the Machinery's Handbook to that shelf....

Problem with scientific laws, they'll get you even if there ain't a cop around....
I'll add those. These are going in a pelican case to be put in the bunker. There isn't much more mechanical knowledge necessary to achieve 19th century tech from scraps left after emp. Idea was conceived prior to cataclysm cycle knowledge.
 

GOBLIN X

INVOLUNTARY full time LAB-RAT for MUSC
Brass Subscriber
#13
used to scrape a bunch of them on de Lavalve and Westinghouse LP steam turbines (600LB) and pedestal bearings, 1 place up in Columbia still does casting babbit bearings. only place i know does it round here
 

Optimist

NMR. 11/04/2020
Brass Subscriber
#14
I've cast 'em for machine tools in times past, but usually small stuff, 15-30 pounds. Would probably have to mix my own metal if I had to do a set today. Only supplier I knew of in Tulsa has closed its doors.